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Author Topic: [Premium Article] Schools of Magic: The History of Vintage Chapters 1-2: 1993-94  (Read 8815 times)
Smmenen
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« on: November 19, 2012, 04:12:46 am »

http://www.eternalcentral.com/?p=3289

Several years in the making.  Major thanks to my teammates, and to Patrick Chapin for suggesting this project way back when. 

Blurb:

Quote
Several years in the making, Schools of Magic: History of Vintage is a brand new series tracing the rich and exciting history of what has become Vintage. Stephen Menendian has been researching the obscure and often forgotten history of Magic’s oldest and most interesting format. For the first time, you can now read the history of Vintage/Type 1 Magic from 1993 to the present. Each chapter will cover a year in the history of the game, highlighting major new printings, innovations and the emergent new decks that resulted. The ultimate payoff for the reader is a profound appreciation for the strategic evolution of the game, and a keen recognition of the ways in which the strategies that emerged in the format that began in 1993-1994 continue unabated today in the Vintage format, from the Weissman school to the O’Brien School. While this series is intended for for Eternal fans, and Vintage players in particular, anyone and everyone who enjoys Magic, from the wily Pro Tour veteran to the kitchen table casual player, will enjoy this story.

In this inaugural article for the Schools of Magic: History of Vintage series, read the story of 1993 and 1994, from the origins and development of the game to the earliest tournaments, and how these things shaped competitive play as we know it today. Recount the epic story of Zak Dolan and Bertrand Lestree’s famous first Magic World Championship battle, and enjoy the earliest decklists in the history of the format, including Bo Bell’s infamous Mind Twist deck. Read about and enjoy the decks of the Wild Magic and Degenerate Era. Learn how Wizards managed the earliest years of Magic, and how each new set transformed the format we now know as Vintage!

This project is open-textured.    Despite my search through archives and interviews with folks, I"m hoping that this project brings more people out of the woodwork, so that I can update and expand these chapters over time. 

The History of Vintage matters.  It matters not just for historical reasons, but because I believe the decks that exist today can be traced directly to decks that existed in 1994.   Even early on in this series, that should become increasingly apparent.  But mid-way through, it becomes undeniable.  The Weissman school, the O'Brien School, the  "Long" school I have not yet named, but is evident in the BrainTwist deck of 1993 to the Spring Magic '94 Winner to the Properity decks of 1997, to Burning Tendrils today, and more.  The better we understand this history, the better we understand our present, and can distill the principles of these schools into a coherent and comprehensible body of knowledge.   

The intent is to publish another chapter roughly once per month.   Chapter 3: 1995, will be published some time next month, and so on.  I hope people really enjoy this.

Full Introduction:

Most Magic players eventually acquire a natural curiosity about the history of the game, cards of the past, famous decks and players, and the origins of the game itself. Their curiosity may have been aroused by an encounter with strange cards on stranger card faces in trading binders or dealer cases. It may be a natural byproduct of sustained engagement and enjoyment of the game in its many facets, including an exploration of the deep card pool and an insatiable desire to find hidden gems and obscure, but useful, tactics. One way or another, Magic players eventually wish to know more about the game they find endlessly intriguing. Anyone who plays the game long enough wishes to know what came before. And, as the average age of the Magic player slowly but inexorably rises, this history becomes living history, a part of each player’s experience of the game itself.

For all these reasons and more Magic history, especially its early history, is fascinating and timeless. Names like Brian Weissman and Mark Justice ring familiar even to younger Magic players, and the great Schools of Magic, whose principles are perpetually retold, inform our strategic understanding of the game today. Books like the Magic Encyclopedia were sought after because they provided a glimpse into this history. But it was only a partial glimpse. Players want to see the cards and learn the sets, but they also want to know the stories that give them meaning and bring them to life, innovations like The Deck in their original context, and appreciate how those innovations changed the game itself (such as changes in the Banned and Restricted List). Never before has there been a narrative that covers this history. I will attempt, as best I can, to correct that omission.

This bold new series is a history of Vintage/Type 1 Magic from 1993 to the present. Each chapter will cover a year in the history of the game. In particular, each chapter will highlight: 1) major new printings, innovations and the emergence new decks that resulted, 2) major tournaments results and the influence of these results on the metagame, 3) changes to the restricted list that resulted from these tournament results, and 4) and the stories behind these developments, the tales of tournament glory and how the players of the era felt about the dominant strategies of the year.

The first chapter covers 1993, the origins of the game, and the pre-History of Vintage, including the various deck strategies that emerged during era of ‘Wild Magic,’ and the early evolution of tournament Magic. The lessons learned in that time became the foundations of the Type 1 format and inform the rules promulgated by the Duelists’ Convocation. The first chapter also explores the challenges of expanding the game, and the enduring legacy of Arabian Nights. The second chapter, 1994, begins with the first restricted list, and covers the first US Nationals, and first World Championship, along with the release of Antiquities, Legends, and the changes that these sets brought. And so on.

The ultimate payoff for the reader will be a profound appreciation for the strategic evolution of the game, and a keen recognition of the ways in which the strategies that emerged in the format that began in 1993-1994 continue unabated today in the Vintage format, from the Weissman school to the O’Brien School. While this series is clearly written for Eternal fans, and Vintage players in particular, anyone and everyone who enjoys Magic, from the Pro Tour veteran to the kitchen table casual player, will gleam insight and understanding from the stories and lessons of Magic’s incredible history. The reader will be left with not only a better appreciation for the genius of the game, but above all a recognition that Magic is a game that truly has a life of its own far beyond what it’s designers could have imagined.
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Troy_Costisick
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2012, 09:08:24 am »

Heya,

I'm glad to see you are finally getting around to publishing this project, Steve.  You are right that the history of Vintage matters.  I hope tons of people read these as they come out.

Peace,

-Troy
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2012, 09:58:34 am »

Quote
Each chapter will cover a year in the history of the game. In particular, each chapter will highlight: 1) major new printings, innovations and the emergence new decks that resulted, 2) major tournaments results and the influence of these results on the metagame, 3) changes to the restricted list that resulted from these tournament results, and 4) and the stories behind these developments, the tales of tournament glory and how the players of the era felt about the dominant strategies of the year.

That sounds awesome; a great scope with which to approach this topic.
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2012, 01:02:43 pm »

Steve, how far along are you in this project?  This seems like an unbelievably large undertaking that will end up being exceptionally long.  Seems like it would be a good read though.
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2012, 01:28:25 pm »

I've outlined entire project (with necessary research & supporting materials), and have thus far composed the first four chapters. 

Originally, I had written the first three chapters as part of a book proposal I was hoping Wizards might be interested in publishing this as part of the 20th Anniversary of Magic.    But ultimately, after delays, decided to move forward with this... Chapters 3 & 4 (1995 & 1996) are in the can. 

One article per month would be daunting, but I've already done the hard legwork. 
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2012, 02:01:06 pm »

Does buying one buy the whole book, or will there be a separate charge for each chapter?
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 02:07:58 pm »

This is not a book, but a series.  It may some day be accumulated into a book, but that would be a long time from now, if ever. 
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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2012, 03:15:34 pm »

This is not a book, but a series.  It may some day be accumulated into a book, but that would be a long time from now, if ever. 

TL:DR, No, I want all your money.
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2012, 03:42:18 pm »

This is not a book, but a series.  It may some day be accumulated into a book, but that would be a long time from now, if ever. 

TL:DR, No, I want all your money.
Why would you even waste your time saying something this worthless? Do you not believe people should be rewarded for their work, or do you expect everything to come to you for free on a silver platter? With each post about Premium content there are always posts like this, and they are without value. If you would support Eternal writers more, the odds are there would be more great content produced. Wink

Does buying one buy the whole book, or will there be a separate charge for each chapter?
To answer this question more completely, the chapters are being sold individually, or more likely as groups (this one is the first two chapters together, for example). We'd like to keep the cost to a minimum so it's very affordable and accessible for anyone to own, and they will be published as they're crafted.

We may be doing a physical book based on this series at some point down the road, but as Steve said above, that's a long way from happening. What I will say about this series though, is that it's extremely informative and interesting to fans of the history of Magic. I've been playing Magic since nearly the beginning (AN & AQ), and I learned quite a bit editing the first two chapters (and also refreshed many things I had forgotten), if that's any indication. I think this series has a lot to offer, and that's why I greenlighted the project on Eternal Central to begin with. There's frankly nothing else of this caliber available for readers, especially something that ties many things together as this does. Each chapter is like a treat for hungry readers out there with an appetite for information.
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2012, 03:56:12 pm »

Content has value, and there is some great content that is provided, for free, on SCG, CFB, Eternal Central, and elsewhere.  If you do not want to pay for the content, that's understandable, but there are many who do, and the writers are still providing a service to the community.

That being said, let's focus on the article, and the content of the article itself.  This thread will not be used as a venue to discuss the merits and detriments of premium content versus free content.

Anyone who continues this line of discussion will open themselves up to action on the part of the staff.
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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2012, 03:58:50 pm »

Well, my comment was one sentence Smile  Hardly "too long to not read"

Seriously, though, this project is designed as a series.   I will only do this series as long as people find it interesting and worth reading.  I will, however, develop the core themes early on so that the project goals can be achieved regardless of how far it goes.   By the time we reach 1997, the major schools of Magic are apparent, and I will be drawing heavily on Robert Hahn's famous work.

My sense is that alot of this history - particularly 1993-1998 -- is not very well known.  I'm digging down and alot deeper than anyone to my knowledge ever has.  I have uncovered a trove of resources (books, Duelists, web archives, etc), interviewed folks, and have found all kinds of hidden gems. 

I've then synthesized this information into a coherent narrative.  To my knowledge, nothing like this has been done before.  The early years are not just a history of Vintage, but a history of the game itself.   The hope is that something like this would have broad appeal.  If you like it, spread the world.  If not, then tell us why. 


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« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2012, 04:06:07 pm »

It seems that we have reached a point where we can measure how much interest there is in an article by how much TMD complains about it costing three dollars.

Congrats Steve, it seems this might be your most sought after work yet.

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Smmenen
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« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2012, 06:21:04 pm »

Thanks Bro.  I hope you are right.  

To be honest, I hope this is something the larger Magic community takes notice of as well.   Every magic player, but especially Vintage players, could benefit and I hope enjoy this history.  

Most histories of the game are incomplete in some way.  My scope is broader and yet more focused.  I'm less interested in the business of the game, and more interested in the dynamics of the game.  This is a history of the game itself.  

In writing, I inhabit the role of historian, which means that I do more than simply describe events or decks, but offer sharp analysis -- trying to situate events and decks into their proper historical context, and trying to discern what matters and why it matters.  As a historian, I can't simply take what people said in a contemporaneous moment at face value.  I have to discern what is truly significant, and what is not.  What is enduring, and what is not.  

My analysis of Bo Bell's deck and, especially, my analysis of Weissman's "The Deck" in Chapter 3, I think exemplify that.  So far, Chapter 3 is my favorite chapter in the series for that reason.  By the time we get to the New York Zoo & Prosperity decks of late 1996 and early 1997, everything will be on the table.  

I think what's so amazing is that the more I uncovered, the more evidence I had in support of my thesis regarding how the "Schools of Magic" that emerged in this critical, formative time period of 1993-96, persist today in new guise.  By the end of this project, the lineage and ancestry to every deck in comtemporary Vintage will be so obvious and so undeniable, that the ignorance so many of us currently have of the format's history will seem a distant memory. 
« Last Edit: November 19, 2012, 07:29:53 pm by Smmenen » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2012, 04:50:15 am »

I really love reading about Magic history, and this is a great project. Thanks a lot for the hard work, Stephen.
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« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2012, 10:23:52 am »

You know you are old when you are mentioned in history articles.  Sad Regardless, I'll try to pick it up; Vintage history is entertaining.

-Sean O'Brien
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« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2012, 01:02:47 pm »

Thanks guys!  

Sean, I would like to interview you...  I would love to hear your take on how I argue that your "school" is essentially the same body of principles that underlie modern Workshop decks.   Chapter 3 will tease this out in detail, but it would be great to hear your take as well.   I'd also just love to include any anecdotes or other insights you may have...

Congratulations on creating the basis for one of the most dominant "Schools" in contemporary vintage.

For folks who don't know what we are talking about, please read Robert Hahn's Essay here: http://classicdojo.org/school/SoM54.html

And be sure to search for Sean's "O'Brien" school. 

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« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2012, 01:02:46 pm »

Sure thing. I'll save my opinions for your article but while I'm reminiscing I think the fall 94 era was the best my deck ever got. Here's a list from post chaos orb restriction era magic (fall 94?); my memory still works somewhat well.

4 Nether Void
4 Dark Ritual
4 Black Vise
4 Mishra's Factory
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Black Lotus
2 Mana Vault
4 Juzám Djinn
4 Sinkhole
4 Underground Sea
8 Swamp
2 City of Brass
1 Demonic Tutor
4 Juggernaut
1 Timetwister
1 Underworld Dreams
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Relic Barrier
4 Strip Mine
1 Chaos Orb

Sideboard started with 4 x Gloom and moved on from there. Hard to believe how dumb I was not to play 4 x Mana Vault and to not play Hurkyl's Recall. But I had to have that one Underworld Dreams!


« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 01:09:27 pm by nedleeds » Logged
Smmenen
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« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2012, 02:33:17 pm »

Very cool.   The manadrain is uncovering Vintage history Smile

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« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2012, 09:48:12 pm »

Do you know when Balance was restricted?  I know got in one event with a deck with 4x Balance, that my friend had put together (though I suspect someone passed the list to him).  It had 4x Balance, Vice, Rack, Bolt, STP, Atog, and all the fast mana available plus the blue broken cards and City of Brass and some Duals for mana.
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« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2012, 10:32:27 pm »

Oh yes, the next chapter covers this history.  Balance is restricted in early 1995, and the deck you are describing is the Maysonet Balance/Rack deck -- which prompted the restriction. 
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« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2012, 10:56:59 am »

Thanks guys!  

Sean, I would like to interview you...  I would love to hear your take on how I argue that your "school" is essentially the same body of principles that underlie modern Workshop decks.   Chapter 3 will tease this out in detail, but it would be great to hear your take as well.   I'd also just love to include any anecdotes or other insights you may have...

Congratulations on creating the basis for one of the most dominant "Schools" in contemporary vintage.

For folks who don't know what we are talking about, please read Robert Hahn's Essay here: http://classicdojo.org/school/SoM54.html

And be sure to search for Sean's "O'Brien" school. 


thats a brilliant link.

I generally don't like paying for articles (as free ones are typically very abundant, and I can't say I've exhausted those yet), but I'll break the trend on this one, as I love the topic. And I would definitely pick up a book on the subject.
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« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2012, 12:18:54 pm »

A very well written piece of history as detailed as entertaining as you have accustomed us to.

Very well played Steve. Looking forward to the next one(s) Smile
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« Reply #22 on: November 24, 2012, 10:04:45 am »

jw steve if ur also including the history of trivia tidbits in early magic such as:
erhnam djinn is an anagram for herman an uncle of richard garfield
iff-biff efreet is based on wat richard called his older sister elizabeth when he was a child
llanowar elves being anagram for WAR ON ALL ELVES
larry nevins disk

and so on? or is it just cards decks ideas etc?

i havent purchased it yet but will soon. i have a really old magic calendar with random trivia about cards and find this history of mtg just as interesting as the game itself. so jw if u were including things like this?

thanks.
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« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2012, 05:38:33 am »

There is so much interesting magic trivia and minutia its hard to know where to begin.   Although I want this history to be comprehensive, it cannot be exhaustive.  I wanted to get into the history of the art work, design and the business side of the game, but decided that -- while interesting -- was not especially relevant to the history and evolution of the Vintage format, which is my focus.  For that reason, I only kept the parts that were relevant to evolving DCI policy.  

The target goal for this project is roughly 20 pages per chapter, which equals about 400 pages for 20 years (1993-2012).   Any longer, and you'd have an unwieldy book and series.  The first chapter, 1993, is necessarily shorter, and 1994 is necessarily longer than that for reasons that become apparent when you read them.   On average, I'm aiming for 20 pages per chapter.  If I were to include all of the interesting bits you mentioned, it would become far too long for most readers.



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« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2012, 11:50:29 am »

Once this is done I sure hope it is sold as a physical book. I'd buy it for sure.
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« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2012, 11:02:21 pm »

I appreciate the interest, but caution that I will only produce chapters so long as there is demand for the previous chapter.   That said, I guarantee that I will write at least up through 1998 (or Chapter 6) of this series, at a minimum Smile    It would be great to get to 2001, but we'll see Smile

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« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2012, 02:50:36 am »


I have a request:  Does anyone know of or have a list of Mark Chalice's "The Machine"? 

This deck is described in the 8th issue of the Duelist as having Animate Dead & Hell's Caretaker with Tetravuses and Triskelions, but no other details are provided.   This would be a legitimate, early Reanimator deck I've been looking for.   

Also, thanks to Sean O'Brien for a great interview that will be excerpted in the next chapter...

I'm digging up some amazing history here...
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« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2012, 08:23:39 am »

I appreciate the interest, but caution that I will only produce chapters so long as there is demand for the previous chapter.
May I ask you how many people interrested would keep you writing?
It could seem selfish, but if I start to read (and buy) a story, I would like to be sure I'll have all of it, and not only the teaser, if you see what I mean.

The whole story is better than the sum of its part, I think.

Anyway, that's a lot of work and a very good initiative.
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« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2012, 10:54:18 am »

I am not sure of the reanimator decklist your talking about but I have a VERY old duelist that lists Brian Wiessman's "the deck" along with the other "tier decks" of the time which included these 2:


4 Birds of Paradise
3 Instill Energy
4 Juzaam Djinn
4 Erhnam Djinn
4 Ice Storm
4 Sinkhole
4 Dark Ritual
1 Mindtwist
2 Demonic Hordes
4 Hypnotic Specter
Demonic Tutor
5 mox
Sol Ring
Black lotus
Ancestral
Time Walk
4 bayou
4 tropical
4 underground sea
4 strip mine

and

4 nicol bolas
4 deep spawn
4 animate dead
4 hell's caretaker
4 triskelion
4 tetravus
5 mox
4 mana Vault
sol ring
black lotus
demonic tutor
ancestral
time walk
mindtwist
4 Yawgmoth's Demon
4 bazaar of baghdad
4 underground sea
4 badlands
4 volcanic island
1 swamp

This might be the deck your speaking of, not sure, but it's what I found.  Glad I kept this duelist.  I figured the first official list of "the deck" was worth keeping.

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« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2012, 12:30:58 pm »

What I used to play back then : (and years after someone told me I was playing some kind of well known archetype)

sol ring 1
moxen 5
black lotus
tundra 4
underground sea 4
volcanic island 2
plateau 2
city of brass 3
scrublands 1
millstone 3
elemental augury 2 (awesome, just like jace tsm)
mana drain 4
counterspell 4
the abyss 1
moat 1
wrath of god 3
balance 3
swords to plownshares 4
disenchant 3
ancestral recall 1
mind twist 1
demonic tutor 1
time walk 1
mishra's factory 2
library of alexandria 1
serra angel 2

sideboard

consecrated land 4
equinox 2
circle of protection red 2
spirit link 2
serra angel 2
pyroclasm 2
tormod's crypt 1
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